Define, Tone and Strengthen Your Chest with These Cable Exercises

Cable Chest with Hilary-COVER

Chest Exercises – Cables 101

If you’re like many people, the first exercise that probably comes to mind when you think about chest exercises is the classic barbell bench press. However, chest exercises aren’t limited to the bench press. In fact, there are a variety of other chest exercises that you can perform with cables!

There are six different motions that you can perform using cables to train your chest muscles, each of which can be performed while sitting or standing. The six standing versions of these exercises will improve your body’s overall balance and stabilization more, while the six sitting versions provide additional isolation on your chest.

Try the cable exercises listed below to train your chest muscles during your next workout.

You’ll notice that these cable exercises have examples for each of the three different angles you can perform them at: flat (level), incline or decline.

Flat (level) cable chest exercises are performed straight out in front of you.

Incline cable chest exercises are performed from a low position to a high position.

Decline cable chest exercises are performed from a high position to a low position.

 

Standing Cable Chest Press – Flat (Level), Incline and Decline

  1. Select an appropriate weight.
  2. Grab the cables in each hand and establish a stable position.
  3. Hold the handles with your elbows bent slightly more than 90 degrees.
  4. Push the weight away from your chest until your arms are fully extended, pause, and then reverse the motion, stopping again just before the weight stack rests in the original position.

Refer to the pictures below for further description.

TOP TIP: Make sure you feel stable in your stance so that you can properly isolate your chest muscle, decreasing the possibility of injury.

TOP TIP: Concentrate on controlling the weight on the way down during the lift. This part of the lift is known as the “eccentric” portion and is just as important for muscle development as it is for safety.

 

Seated Cable Chest Press – Flat (Level), Incline and Decline

  1. Select an appropriate weight.
  2. Grab the cables in each hand and establish a stable position.
  3. Hold the handles with your elbows bent slightly more than 90 degrees.
  4. Push the weight away from your chest until your arms are fully extended, pause, and then reverse the motion, stopping again just before the weight stack rests in the original position.

Refer to the pictures below for further description.

TOP TIP: Concentrate on controlling the weight on the way down during the lift. This part of the lift is known as the “eccentric” portion and is just as important muscle development as it is for safety.

 

Standing Cable Fly – Flat (Level), Incline and Decline

  1. Select an appropriate weight.
  2. Grab the cables in each hand and establish a stable position with your arms extended out to the sides of your body.
  3. Maintaining a slight bend at your elbows, squeeze the handles toward each other replicating the motion you would make if you were performing a bear hug.
  4. Stop once your hands meet in front of you, pause, and then reverse the motion, stopping again just before the weight stack rests in the original position.

Refer to the pictures below for further description.

TOP TIP: It is very important that you control the weight on the way down during this lift to prevent injuries and isolate your chest muscles. Your arms will want to fling back, but you must control the weight, do not let it control you. If you cannot control the weight lower it.

TOP TIP: Make sure you keep your elbows bent the same amount as you complete this lift. They will want to bend more the further you extend out but do not let them. Lower the weight if you are unable to do this as well.

TOP TIP: DO NOT use any other part of your body to “swing” the weight up. If you can’t complete the exercise you should lower the weight.

TOP TIP: If you are feeling more fatigued in your biceps you are probably bending your elbows too much.

TOP TIP: Take this lift extra slow (especially if it’s your first time).

 

Seated Cable Fly – Flat (Level), Incline and Decline

  1. Select an appropriate weight.
  2. Grab the cables in each hand and establish a stable position with your arms extended out to the sides of your body.
  3. Maintaining a slight bend at your elbows, squeeze the handles toward each other replicating the motion you would make if you were performing a bear hug.
  4. Stop once your hands meet in front of you, pause, and then reverse the motion, stopping again just before the weight stack rests in the original position.

Refer to the pictures below for further description.

TOP TIP: It is very important that you control the weight on the way down during this lift to prevent injuries and isolate your chest muscles. Your arms will want to fling back, but you must control the weight, do not let it control you. If you cannot control the weight lower it.

TOP TIP: Make sure that you maintain a slight bend in your elbows bent the same amount as you complete this lift. They will want to bend more the further you extend out but do not let them.

TOP TIP: Concentrate on controlling the weight on the way down during the lift. This part of the lift is known as the “eccentric” portion and is just as important for strength and muscle development as it is for safety.

TOP TIP: If you are feeling more fatigued in your biceps you are probably bending your elbows too much.

TOP TIP: Take this lift extra slow (especially if it’s your first time).

 

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Posted on March 26, 2015, in Easy, exercise, Exercises 101, fat loss, fitness, fitness club, Health, Helpful, LA Fitness, LA Fitness Blog - Living Healthy, LA Fitness Blog - Top Tips, la fitness reviews, LA Fitness Reviews - About, lafitness.com, Strength, Top Tips and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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